The Story of Josh…so far

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Josh likes using heavy duty tools so he had great fun with the chain saw and now we have lots of lovely chunks of wood for the winter. His dad never got a look in 🙂

We went off to the hospital together yesterday to meet with the dietician. Normally Josh goes off on his own for appts but this one was all about carb counting so I went along too as I need to have some understanding of it as I cook most of the meals here.

His sugars have been climbing recently so we were wondering if the small window of pancreatic activity was coming to an end. We were told when he was first starting insulin that often the pancreas kicks back in and those poor old tired beta cells make one last effort to make insulin themselves before finally giving up the ghost. This can lead to a lot of hypos as Josh soon discovered. Now his sugars are climbing he finds spending some solid time with a chain saw helps bring them down again. Chain saw therapy. Umm.

Carb counting consists of working out how much carb is in anything he eats and then giving the right amount of insulin to go with it. The dietitian reckons 10g of carb is about 1 unit of insulin in most people although it varies so there’s a bit of trial and error. We will need to weigh his carbs before he eats each meal-at least to begin with- some things will be much the same; a piece of toast or a bowl of cereal so once he has the first lot of carbs worked out he can judge from that. We have been given lists of food and their carb count to help us along. It’s a big commitment for all of us, especially Josh who will need to do this forever-but it should mean he can have a fairly normal life.

He has let the DVLA know about his diabetes and showed his knowledge of what to do if he should have a hypo on the bike. (Okay it still scares me but he does know what to do at least). He was warned that could be prosecuted if he had an accident because of a hypo! I didn’t know that! Apparently the police treat it as drug induced, which I suppose they may have a point about as the insulin user needs to make the judgement on safe driving. Perhaps it acts as a deterrent against silly people taking chances.

Josh starts Uni in Sept. He really has been through a lot to get to this point. His A Levels were made difficult by the fact that teachers kept leaving.  Nevertheless he and his friends kept at it and most of them left school with reasonable grades. Josh then got a job as a care assistant in a home for elderly people. He worked hard and raised the money he would need to go to America where he arranged for an interview at Franciscan Uni Steubenville in Ohio.

Thanks to a good friend, Shana, Josh had families to stay with from the local homeschool community there. He worked for bed and board and was made to feel very welcome.

At interview Josh was offered a place at FUS to do Drama and theology. They have their own TV studio and some world renowned lecturers among whom are Dr Scott Hahn.

Sadly despite working a lot more shifts and writing to anyone we could think of, there was no money to help fund the degree over there. Josh has  worked and worked and saved quite a bit in the hope that one day he will be able to return to FUS and either do a post grad course there or at least have work placements over there.

After working a huge amount of hours-getting on for nearly 60hrs a week Josh became ill and was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. He has coped remarkably well with both the diagnoses and the regime of blood tests and injections.

He got a place at a local Uni to study Drama.  Then thanks to the daft system with UCAS was told he didn’t have a place after all. After a frantic few days he has, again, had his place confirmed.

He has had to hand his notice in at work because every shift he was having a hypo; however he hopes there will be work at Uni and he has hopes of a job teaching fencing to children.

It’s been an incredibly tough time for Josh but he has worked hard and we wish him well. Please keep him in your prayers.

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4 responses to “The Story of Josh…so far

  1. prayers for Josh.

    How disappointing about FUS. I’m sure God knows what he’s doing, but that doesn’t stop it from being disappointing. Hoping Josh gets in for post-grad or something.

  2. He’ll be back here, and attending FUS at some point, I’ll bet!

    It is just so hard sometimes to understand what God has planned, until we are looking back on it, and can see how it all worked for the glory of God.

    Our prayers with Josh as he takes off on the new Uni venture! I’m having a Hornsby’s Crisp Apple Cider in his honor! Cheers!

  3. We have trampoline therapy in this house to bring sugars down. Sometimes it works really well.

    I think when Tom is older, he may enjoy chain saw therapy. I don’t know if I will though.

    The end of the honeymoon period can be hard and learning carb ratios is also hard. It won’t be long though and both you and Josh will know the amount without even a calculator.

    I am pretty good on breads, fruits and most vegetables now.

  4. I think your son has done really well to handle everything that has been thrown at him this year, i’m sure the way he has dealt with being diagnosed and also having his hopes dashed about U.s uni, will stand him in good stead for where adulthood will lead him.

    My girl will be applying for uni around this time next year, i just know this last year at sixth form is going to whizz by. She doesn’t know what she wants to do yet, nor which uni she will apply for…she has visited Keele and Manchester Uni and is also considering London, Birmingham and a couple of others i forget the name of as i write this.

    She is thinking of commuting from home (not to London, obviously!) as she is pretty much a home girl. I think she wants the family support and it will be better for her financially, even with the commute fares – she is currently having driving lessons so eventually if she has a car it will be more economical to drive the comute than pay the train fares.

    I will remember Josh in my prayers

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