Wedding preparation: making butter.

It is the week leading up to Alex and Anna’s wedding.  The Reception, which they are having in our Church Hall will be a bring and share feast. So the cooking is under way. Iona has the cake to made and there are scones and tea loaf for freezing before the day.

I have just made a batch of butter. It’s pretty easy to make.

I had two big tubs of double cream (it was on offer – the best time to buy it for making butter)

If, like me, you are lucky enough to have a Kenwood with the K beater – you’re made.

P1020078Pour the cream into the bowl and start beating it. The cream will thicken and get stiff. Watch at that moment because the transition from thick cream to butter happens rather suddenly.

You will find the butter and buttermilk have separated.  Pour off the buttermilk into a jug.

You need very cold water. Pour some in with the butter and beat very slowly. More buttermilk will form which you can pour off. I usually manage to do a couple of these before I need to take the butter out and wash it the final few times. I put the butter in a bowl and rinse it a few times under the tap until the water runs off nearly clear. Press the butter to leach out the final water.

Rinsing and washing is important to prevent the butter going rancid.

Then I rolled the butter out and using Iona’s embossing sheet (she uses forP1020079 cakes) embossed the butter with swirls. Then cut them into pieces. I’ve carefully stacked the pieces between sheets of silicon paper and now they are chilling.

You can freeze butter. Home made butter doesn’t last as long as shop butter because the only ingredient is the butter. But the more I learn about food production the more I would rather make my own.

The butter milk was handed straight to Iona who is making batches of scones with it.

P1020077


So people can have a little pat of butter to go with their scones.

I did not add salt. If you are going to freeze butter it can overly enhance the salt. Anyway, it’s so creamy and fresh, who needs salt?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s