Thinking and speaking and the major obstacle of the phone.

I lose my voice on a regular basis- in fact I have no voice right now – and my husband rather likes it. Cheeky divil! (as m’gran would say). Then there’s the entertaining aphasia in which dishwashers become fish-dishes and disappearing boxes as my dd so eloquently relates. Along with this are the times when the words are there and I can’t get them in the right order to make sense, or when someone is speaking to me and they sound like the parents in Humpf “blah blah blah”. I know they are saying real words but I just can’t make my head work out the meaning. This happens more often  and is much worse when I’m tired or when I’m on the phone.

I slur my words like a drunk and mix them up so I can speak like Yoda.

vintage-hollywood-LUCY-on-phoneAnd what is it with the phone? I think it must be that the only clues my brain is getting is spoken language, and because I can’t see the person speaking, it’s much harder to understand them. There are plenty of times when this isn’t a problem at all, but at other times I have to really concentrate hard to understand what someone is saying to me and sometimes I say something banal in reply because I just don’t really get it.

I am not sure why, but for long periods of time I can behave like a sane person (my children may disagree). I can enunciate and use the appropriate vocabulary for the occasion. I sometimes have the skills I had when I worked, taking messages, handing out complicated information (in two languages) and generally looking and sounding efficient. Then out of the blue – it’s all gone. Worse still, I can’t always tell beforehand that it has gone , so I’ll answer the phone and be struggling to make sense or understand the other person.  The fish-man can phone and I am struggling to remember what a fish is, let alone whether I want to order any.

My children are remarkably patient. My husband has a wicked sense of humour over it but that keeps it from getting too scary. I still tease him about the night he came home to find no dinner cooked and me unable to string a coherent word together, let alone a sentence. He looked at me with that face he does and said, “I’d better get a takeaway.”

I’ve got an appointment with a speech therapist in October. She’s supposed to be assessing me for some kind of larynx dysfunction. We’ll see what happens there.

THIS SITE on Dysautonomia has just been shown me. It’s pretty good, clear info on the joys of having this silly illness. All I would say is the advice about salt should be taken with extreme caution; salt is for people with neurally mediated hypotension and low blood volume which usually manifests with narrow pulse pressure. Those of us on the other end of the dysauto scale with hyperadrenergic stuff going on; hypertension; or like me rapidly fluctuating blood pressure, and wide pulse pressure (had one of 80 recently YIKES!) should not be taking salt. unless a doc has noticed sodium issues and that needs proper treatment anyway.

I do get salt cravings- I know this happens with other dysauto folks too. It is more likely due to electrolyte imbalance than a genuine need to grab the Marmite. Try Diaoralyte instead m’dears. (Marmite tastes better…)

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