Tag Archives: dysautonomia

Hospital Appointment – larynx/throat speech specialist

I’m sorry to write two medical posts one after the other but I had my hospital appt yesterday and thought I’d tell y’all about it.

I saw a speech cum throat- especially larynx specialist. I had been referred to her by my Respiratory Consultant who suspected that some of the asthma and other breathing problems may be Vocal Cord Dysfunction.

She took a very thorough history – I was in there for an hour – on NHS time!  We went through the different breathing problems; some obviously asthma, some orthostatic, some being something else. She was interested in the problems I’m having with swallowing and eating – without immediately jumping to daft conclusions.

Then she stuck a camera up my nose and down my throat. This is just the sort of thing a good Catholic girlie can “offer up” 🙂

From this delightful experience she told me straight away that my throat was “cherry red” and otherwise a bit of a mess. So I now have a dx of Vocal Cord Dysfunction (VCD) and EERD (a form of reflux)

In her talk about how VCD works she spoke of it as a spectrum disorder. On the mild end are those who have what I suppose sounds like voice strain; teachers, soldiers and opera singers being the most common patients. (As my Resp Con is a Colonal in the army I wonder if that’s how he guessed so quickly what was happening to me).

On the rough end come those of us with severe asthma and autonomic nervous system problems. She hadn’t heard of dysautonomia as hyperadrenergic POTS or IST but she really quickly grasped the ANS dysfunction side of things for me and how that kicks in with VCD.

I’m to start therapy which will be around breathing exercises and voice control. There’s no cure as it’s obviously ANS related but it can be better managed – which I’m all for.

THIS PAPER IS A VERY GOOD OVERVIEW

Since the TIA last week I’ve had some problems with being upright and breathing. Needing to lie down more often and the bloomin’ stairs are a killer. I’ve set something off that I can’t get on top of right now. What a shambles.

Dysautonomia Awareness month

autonomic systemIn the slightly strange world I inhabit I know quite a few people around the net who either have some form of dysautonomia or have one of the many co-mobidities that we have and so know about dysautonomia, even if they don’t have it. This can give me the false impression that everyone has heard of it and at least, has a general idea of what it is.

Dysautonomia isn’t well known and part of the reason is that it is supposed to be rare. The most common form is POTS with NMH; that is postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with neurally mediated hypotension. The people with this get tachy when upright and their BP can drop like a stone. A lot of people with this have low blood volume.

fight flightHyperadrenergic POTS is even rarer. We get tachy when upright and our BP will shoot upwards and for those of us on the “combo” end of things it will nose dive and shoot up again. It’s because the normal fight or flight responses are stuck on “ON” mode. This comes with the added complication that while we seem to be pumping out the adrenaline (ephinephrine) which is changed into noradreneline (norepinephrine) it might never really make it to dopamine, or if it does, not much dopamine is made. If it is made the uptake is poor and if the uptake can cope even a little, the re-uptake is bust. This is probably the root of my tremor and possibly the myoclonus too.

The depressed immune system means we have fun with infections.

Then in a small corner of rarity is IST – inappropriate sinus tachycardia. We have tachycardia all the time. In my case it’s around 100 (without meds) when I’m sitting still and can get down to the high 80s if I lie still – but often can’t do that. Upright it can get up in the 150s which is mild compared to some folk.

IST is thought to be a form of POTS but the medical jury is still out on that one. As there is very little research on IST – less than other POTS forms, it seems unlikely we’ll get many answers any time soon.

Other symptoms are brain fog – I hate it – confusion, memory loss, visual changes and auditory sensitivities.

We also get seizures. POTs related seizures are common and horrible. I had a one off the other night – thank God it was a one off. Seemed to be because I was particularly shattered. Not infection related this time. And that’s another problem – we don’t get seizures for one reason, we get them for a load and doctors like to call them “idiopathic” meaning they don’t know what causes them. They don’t respond to anticonvulsants unfortunately, so we are left with no treatment.

Dysautonomia ranges from mild through to severe where people are mostly stuck in bed with NG tube for feeding and sometimes oxygen. On the nasty end dysauto can be fatal; respiratory failure, heart attack, stroke seem to be the lead CoD.

This is a reasonably good article on IST as part of Dysautonomia.

So what does getting aware mean? Well first of all – if you have someone in your life with this disease, say a prayer for them. Be patient with them when they are acting spaced, foggy, tired or just off. Don’t assume that someone who is trying their best to be as normal as possible can keep that up every day. Crash days, weeks and even months happen. Be kind.

If you have money and know a good charity or research thingy then please do donate. We need research if we are ever to get good treatment, let alone a cure.

Thinking and speaking and the major obstacle of the phone.

I lose my voice on a regular basis- in fact I have no voice right now – and my husband rather likes it. Cheeky divil! (as m’gran would say). Then there’s the entertaining aphasia in which dishwashers become fish-dishes and disappearing boxes as my dd so eloquently relates. Along with this are the times when the words are there and I can’t get them in the right order to make sense, or when someone is speaking to me and they sound like the parents in Humpf “blah blah blah”. I know they are saying real words but I just can’t make my head work out the meaning. This happens more often  and is much worse when I’m tired or when I’m on the phone.

I slur my words like a drunk and mix them up so I can speak like Yoda.

vintage-hollywood-LUCY-on-phoneAnd what is it with the phone? I think it must be that the only clues my brain is getting is spoken language, and because I can’t see the person speaking, it’s much harder to understand them. There are plenty of times when this isn’t a problem at all, but at other times I have to really concentrate hard to understand what someone is saying to me and sometimes I say something banal in reply because I just don’t really get it.

I am not sure why, but for long periods of time I can behave like a sane person (my children may disagree). I can enunciate and use the appropriate vocabulary for the occasion. I sometimes have the skills I had when I worked, taking messages, handing out complicated information (in two languages) and generally looking and sounding efficient. Then out of the blue – it’s all gone. Worse still, I can’t always tell beforehand that it has gone , so I’ll answer the phone and be struggling to make sense or understand the other person.  The fish-man can phone and I am struggling to remember what a fish is, let alone whether I want to order any.

My children are remarkably patient. My husband has a wicked sense of humour over it but that keeps it from getting too scary. I still tease him about the night he came home to find no dinner cooked and me unable to string a coherent word together, let alone a sentence. He looked at me with that face he does and said, “I’d better get a takeaway.”

I’ve got an appointment with a speech therapist in October. She’s supposed to be assessing me for some kind of larynx dysfunction. We’ll see what happens there.

THIS SITE on Dysautonomia has just been shown me. It’s pretty good, clear info on the joys of having this silly illness. All I would say is the advice about salt should be taken with extreme caution; salt is for people with neurally mediated hypotension and low blood volume which usually manifests with narrow pulse pressure. Those of us on the other end of the dysauto scale with hyperadrenergic stuff going on; hypertension; or like me rapidly fluctuating blood pressure, and wide pulse pressure (had one of 80 recently YIKES!) should not be taking salt. unless a doc has noticed sodium issues and that needs proper treatment anyway.

I do get salt cravings- I know this happens with other dysauto folks too. It is more likely due to electrolyte imbalance than a genuine need to grab the Marmite. Try Diaoralyte instead m’dears. (Marmite tastes better…)