Tag Archives: IST

Dysautonomia – what did you say that was?

Global Dysautonomia Awareness Month copyHere’s quite a good explanation of the basics of dysautonomia. I notice she includes CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome) in the list. There is good science behind the idea that fibromyalgia is dysautonomic as it looks to be a form of hyperadrenergicPOTS. But I wasn’t aware that CFS has been included. It’s not that surprising though as some doctors (one in Australia that I can never remember the name of in particular) insist that up to 96% of patients with a dx of ME/CFS have some form of dysautonomia. But as Ramsay felt that a dx of dysautonomia meant a patient couldn’t have ME it’s a bit confusing.

Symptoms are very varied to the point where it has been said that each patient is different and certainly my Cardiologist agrees with that.

Death rates have not been measured although it seems to have a similar rate of suicide to other poorly treated chronic illnesses and there are a number of reports of sudden death similar to those associated with ME/cfs. As many of us have serious lung and Blood pressure problems it doesn’t seem that surprising that deaths happen. Studies in ME/Cfs show that heart failure is the number one cause of death with suicide coming in joint second with cancer – some more unusual cancers being oddly common among ME patients.

Talking anecdotaly I have come across a few people with a single diagnosesstanding usually POTS or IST without blood pressure problems or anything else. The symptoms of POTS and IST can be pretty horrible on their own but there’s definitely a difference in degree compared to those of us with ME/Cfs and/or fibromyalgia to go with it.

Most people I know with ME have some kind of orthostatic intolerance. Mine is pretty bad these days. Can’t stay upright for very long without becoming nauseous, light headed breathless and blacking out (pre-synocope).

dys5I don’t know what the end result of any research will be. There are tentative (poorly funded) moves to separate out the various forms of ME to get more accurate dx and hopefully treatment. It will very likely show that dysautonomia is either a form of ME or caused by ME or isn’t ME, but is dysautonomia.

One day we hope there will be suitable treatments that can put us into remission. But so far, that just isn’t the case.

Saw a GP today and hit the “they don’t know what to do” wall. Back on steroids but feeling pretty fed up. She did say she’d talk to my usual doc but she really wanted to refer me to another (insert very rude word here) neurologist. I refused.  Presently sofa’d – hope the steroids help.

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Dysautonomia Awareness month

autonomic systemIn the slightly strange world I inhabit I know quite a few people around the net who either have some form of dysautonomia or have one of the many co-mobidities that we have and so know about dysautonomia, even if they don’t have it. This can give me the false impression that everyone has heard of it and at least, has a general idea of what it is.

Dysautonomia isn’t well known and part of the reason is that it is supposed to be rare. The most common form is POTS with NMH; that is postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with neurally mediated hypotension. The people with this get tachy when upright and their BP can drop like a stone. A lot of people with this have low blood volume.

fight flightHyperadrenergic POTS is even rarer. We get tachy when upright and our BP will shoot upwards and for those of us on the “combo” end of things it will nose dive and shoot up again. It’s because the normal fight or flight responses are stuck on “ON” mode. This comes with the added complication that while we seem to be pumping out the adrenaline (ephinephrine) which is changed into noradreneline (norepinephrine) it might never really make it to dopamine, or if it does, not much dopamine is made. If it is made the uptake is poor and if the uptake can cope even a little, the re-uptake is bust. This is probably the root of my tremor and possibly the myoclonus too.

The depressed immune system means we have fun with infections.

Then in a small corner of rarity is IST – inappropriate sinus tachycardia. We have tachycardia all the time. In my case it’s around 100 (without meds) when I’m sitting still and can get down to the high 80s if I lie still – but often can’t do that. Upright it can get up in the 150s which is mild compared to some folk.

IST is thought to be a form of POTS but the medical jury is still out on that one. As there is very little research on IST – less than other POTS forms, it seems unlikely we’ll get many answers any time soon.

Other symptoms are brain fog – I hate it – confusion, memory loss, visual changes and auditory sensitivities.

We also get seizures. POTs related seizures are common and horrible. I had a one off the other night – thank God it was a one off. Seemed to be because I was particularly shattered. Not infection related this time. And that’s another problem – we don’t get seizures for one reason, we get them for a load and doctors like to call them “idiopathic” meaning they don’t know what causes them. They don’t respond to anticonvulsants unfortunately, so we are left with no treatment.

Dysautonomia ranges from mild through to severe where people are mostly stuck in bed with NG tube for feeding and sometimes oxygen. On the nasty end dysauto can be fatal; respiratory failure, heart attack, stroke seem to be the lead CoD.

This is a reasonably good article on IST as part of Dysautonomia.

So what does getting aware mean? Well first of all – if you have someone in your life with this disease, say a prayer for them. Be patient with them when they are acting spaced, foggy, tired or just off. Don’t assume that someone who is trying their best to be as normal as possible can keep that up every day. Crash days, weeks and even months happen. Be kind.

If you have money and know a good charity or research thingy then please do donate. We need research if we are ever to get good treatment, let alone a cure.

It’s not the anger, it’s the guilt.

DownloadSomeone I was in a short email correspondence with said that if it should happen that he became seriously ill, he would be very angry. I have to say, I doubt it. I don’t claim to know the inner emotional workings of the man who wrote this, but I do know how chronic illness works, and believe me, anger is a very tiring emotion and therefore not one that is tenable, for long periods of time. I’m not saying I’ve never felt angry or seen anger expressed by fellow Chronics – I have. Those of us who have rubbish or even abusive meetings with doctors will express justifiable anger; and sadly that happens far too often. But that’s just for those times.

The feeling or sense that bugs me much more of the time is guilt. I don’t know how ubiquitous this feeling is among us chronics, but it’s fairly constant with me, and as I think I’m pretty common, I am guessing there are others out there who struggle with it. I am not going to go into all the reasons I feel guilty, nor will I explain those awful moments when it comes to a head and I become a gibbering wreck. You don’t need to read about that.

This is not Catholic guilt. Wish it was – ‘cuz Confession cures that 😆

No, this guilt is about all the things I used to do that I can’t do. Some of it isn’t just guilt it’s a kind of jealousy of others which in turn leads to guilt; not just about what they can do I can’t, but guilt over the jealousy as well as guilt over not being able to do stuff. Quite a complicated mess for a brain-fogger to handle. Tiring mess at times too, leaving little left for something like anger.

So, how to deal with it.

First – a reality check. Sometimes things are bloomin’orrid and that’s life. So, accept reality. Don’t paint it worse than it is, and don’t run and hide from it. Get down with Fr Fran Fortuna’s Everybody Gotta Suffer and accept. This is easy to write and difficult to do, but it is, honestly, worth the effort.

Second; don’t assume that other people are cross that you can’t do what you used to do. Projection is a bad coping mechanism and is more likely to make the picker-upperer (there’s a word that just needs to exist) of your lost ability more cross with you than the business of picking up where you left off.

I know that many people are not projecting – that their friends and even family do tell them they are lazy, need to try harder, pull themselves together. The most difficult thing here to to stick with reality and accept that they are the one with the bad attitude and it isn’t your fault.

Third: Don’t give up because of the silly guilt. There is some mechanism in false-guilt that leads to fear. So, the temptation is, to throw up your hands (or just one if the other one won’t coordinate) and cry “Forget it! I give up!”

Take the good days and enjoy them. I’ve had odd days when I can play the piano again and even cook a meal once in a while without burning something, leaving something raw, filling the kitchen with smoke or killing any of the kids.

Lastly but most importantly of all be grateful.

If you just threw something at the computer screen, take it back and think a minute. There are still good things in life, even with chronic illness. I’m not saying pretend things are better than they are – but just be glad for the things that are good.

If you have reached that awful point where you just can’t see anything good then look for something small – a flower in bloom, a slice of cake or even the smell of rain. Anything that holds something good in it.

Finally it’s worth remembering that for people with ME/cfs and some forms of Dysautonomia that emotions can get a bit weird. Mood is heavily influenced by things like how our adrenals work, serotonin uptake, how malnourished we have become because of a busted metabolism and the generally busted HPO axis. This, coupled with mood changing drugs such as steroids can have quite an effect on our coping skills.

All we can do is keep at it. One day at a time – and on bad days one hour at time.

PS. I think I mentioned in a post where I’d seen the Cardiologist that I had decided not to have the tests for hyperadrenergic POTS done because they are very complicated and need lots of time and very skilled people.  Jackie’s very informative post here gives you the info on the tests.

ENDNOTE: I may also have mentioned that I am now on 10 mg twice a day of Ivabradine and as the max dose is 7.5 mg twice a day I spent a long time in the hospital pharmacy with my son.  Well, first repeat prescription request has hit the wall as the pharmacist is having the heeby-jeebies over handing the stuff over. I had written clearly on the the request that this was the Consultant Cardio’s decision and had been okayed by the hospital pharmacy and I assume the letter is in my notes by now – but it looks like there’s still some sorting out to do. I only hope this isn’t going to be an issue every time I need a repeat.  No anger or guilt – just frustration!

Back to the steroids, or not?

I was given a script for Prednisolone to keep by for those sudden onset emergencies. The idea was to help prevent my rather inconvenient (to me, the kids and the doc) sudden requirement to turn up at the GP for the nebuliser and   the inevitable script for yet more Prednisolone. The heat hasn’t helped my breathing. My lungs are having a hissy fit and while my dear ol heart and BP seem fairly stable (whoo-hoo) (for now – I am nothing if not a realist) my lungs are squeaking wheezing and waking me up at night demanding air. They are showing signs (again) of being too idle to bother to breathe unless I’m awake to help them. Honestly, you can’t get the organs these days!

The Big Pillow is back on the bed. This works a bit like calling in dad – the Big Gun- when teenage boys got a bit too big for their already over-sized boots and dad needs a word. So the Big Pillow keeps me more-or-less upright at night so I can breathe and then if I slip my lungs are quick enough to wake me up demanding better posture and more air.

Originally the pillow was a breastfeeding and baby nest thing so it’s big, and firmish. I recommend them for you fellow lung-lubbers.

Now, I hate taking steroids and up until recently I have also loved the little things. You see, while I am acutely aware of the nasty side effects and the long term nasties in particular thanks to a looooong history of taking steroids orally, intramuscular and IV I also am aware that they work like a minor miracle; not just on my breathing but on pain and that bone grinding feeling that goes with it.

As most of the side effects are part of my “normal” illness anyway I haven’t noticed much other than the weight gain and the moon face. I can spot a fellow steroidy by that face.

So, back to the question at hand. I have the Pred in my drug box. I am struggling to breathe and I have two reasons to take them. First – it might help avoid a doctors appt or an emergency doc appt. and second, we’re off on holidays soon and I don’t want to spend the hols doing a magical mystery tour of Scotland’s NHS provision. It won’t be good for the family.

My dh says everyone will take it in their stride if I need to sample the NHS up north. And I’m sure he’s right. But we are off with 5 of the children and a girlfriend. I would rather steer clear of stethoscopes and hissing masks.

Is that a good reason to take the Prednisolone? Because I’m a bit (ok, quite a bit) worried about wrecking the hols for everyone?

Who knew that taking drugs could be a moral or ethical question?

Having written all that my lungs have made the decision for me – back on the Pred.

On a side note, the Respiratory Doc has spotted that some of my breathing problems are not just asthma. He is a bit concerned that I’ve been on almost daily high doses of steroids for months and months and wants to separate out the asthma – that needs steroids and the other stuff that might need something else.

While there’s definitely the Lump in my throat around my voice box thing at the moment I am pretty sure it’s asthma.